Print ISSN: 1681-6900

Online ISSN: 2412-0758

Keywords : Coarse aggregate


Experimental Investigation of the Production of Sustainable Lightweight Concrete

Mouhammed J. Lafta

Engineering and Technology Journal, 2020, Volume 38, Issue 11, Pages 1652-1665
DOI: 10.30684/etj.v38i11A.1621

An experimental study on four types of coarse aggregate was conducted to produce lightweight concrete. These four types are namely; white limestone, red limestone, clay brick fragments, and pumice. Ordinary Portland cement was used for all examined mixes. Water to cement ratio (w/c) was modified according to the effect of coarse aggregate type on the workability of the resulted concrete for each mix. The reference concrete mix, which is normal concrete, water to cement ratio used was (0.5). The investigated characteristics for all concrete mixes were workability, compressive strength, dry density, absorption, and thermal conductivity. Results indicated that the aggregate type significantly affects most of the properties of lightweight concrete mixes such as workability, density, and thermal insulation for all tested types of concrete. All investigated specimens indicated improvement in terms of density, workability, and thermal conductivity when compared to the reference concrete mix. Yet, it was derived from the testing results that using pumice in lightweight concrete production is the optimum option among the other examined types. When compared to normal concrete, this type of lightweight concrete showed a 41% decrease in dry density, nearly 72.54% decrease in thermal conductivity, and about 12% increase in workability. However, it is vital to notice that due to the low compressive strength and the relatively high absorption capability for all the examined types of lightweight concrete, it is suggested to use these types of concrete for non-structural walls that are not subjected to or exposed to high humidity.

Effect of Using Windows Waste Glass as Coarse Aggregate on Some Properties of Concrete

Abdelmaseeh Bakos Keryou; Gailan Jibrael Ibrahim

Engineering and Technology Journal, 2014, Volume 32, Issue 6, Pages 1519-1529

In this experimental study, local waste glass (WG) gathered from Turkey-made windows glass has been used as a partial replacement of coarse aggregates with 0, 20, 25, and 30% percentages of replacement by weight. Some mechanical and other properties of the concrete, produced this way have been studied at both fresh and hardened stages.
The experimental results obtained from testing the specimens prepared from concrete mixes with water/cement ratio equal to 0.5, showed that using WG resulted in decreasing the slump and fresh density due to angular grain shape, whereas the compressive, splitting, and flexural strengths noticeably enhanced. Tests revealed that with increasing the WG percentage the strengths gradually increase up to a given limit beyond which they decrease. The maximum effect was reached at 25% percentage of replacement. At this percentage the increases in the compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strengths at 28-day age were 30, 38 and 31 %, respectively. The results of this study indicate a considerable economical effect from using the optimum percentage of WG (25%) as partial replacement of coarse aggregate.

Effect of Coarse Aggregate Characteristics on Drying Shrinkage of Concrete

Tareq Salih Al-Attar

Engineering and Technology Journal, 2008, Volume 26, Issue 2, Pages 146-153

Concrete is a composite material, consisting, mainly, of three phases: coarse
aggregate, cement mortar, and the interface zone between them. The characteristics
of the interface zone largely govern the bond between cement paste or mortar and
aggregate. The restraining effect of aggregate to drying shrinkage strain depends
much on the bond between aggregate and cement paste.
In this paper, it is aimed to investigate the effect of coarse aggregate
characteristics, that affect bond strength, such as; type, shape, surface texture, and
moisture content, on drying shrinkage. Four types of coarse aggregate were used.
Three of them were normal-weight, while the fourth was a light-weight one. Each
type of coarse aggregate was used in two moisture conditions, dry and saturated.
The testing program extended to 150-days age and comprised; length change,
modulus of elasticity, compressive and splitting tensile strength of concrete.
It is concluded that using saturated coarse aggregate always yields higher
shrinkage strain than dry aggregate. The percentage increase seems to be affected
by the aggregate water absorption. At early ages, After 28 days, there is large
differences in relative shrinkage for different mixes. Later than 28 days, the
variation in ratios settled to approximately fixed values